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Where does all the snow go?

Where does all the snow go?

COOPERSVILLE, Mich.—This winter is nearing another record for snowfall; so where does all that snow go?

In Coopersville, just look to Vets Park.  City Manager Steven Patrick says the city has given local businesses the green light to bring their snow to the park, where it will be stored until the warm weather returns and makes it melt.  Hauling snow to the open area helps eliminate potentially dangerous snowbanks on the edges of roadways, which can block drivers’ sight.  It also provides more space on roads and parking lots, which have shrunk as the piles have grown.

Patrick says dropping off snow at the park has been the practice of the city for years, so if residents see vehicles hauling snow into the park, rest assured that the city has given its approval. 

Residents asked to adopt a fire hydrant and potentially save lives

Residents asked to adopt a fire hydrant and potentially save lives

COOPERSVILLE, Mich.—   The City of Coopersville is asking community members to do a little extra digging in the snow to help avoid a potentially deadly situation.

 Kim Grupa Ayers, the assistant to the city manager, says Coopersville is home to more than 250 hydrants, and some have been buried by the heavy snows.  Ayers says the city doesn’t have enough staff to keep up with clearing hydrants, but it’s important there is access, since the time it takes to find and tap a hydrant can mean the difference between life and death during a fire.

The city is asking residents to adopt a nearby fire hydrant and help keep it clear.  It's a request Alpine Township is also making of its residents, citing slippery roads and frozen hose lines as other winter hindrances for firefighters battling flames.  The Township's website reads: "Please do your part to keep you and your neighbors safe by clearing hydrants of snow."

Planning commission to review Coopersville Master Plan

Planning commission to review Coopersville Master Plan

COOPERSVILLE, Mich.-- The Coopersville Planning Commission will review and begin revising the city's Master Plan during the regular commission meeting Monday, Jan. 20.

The review session comes as developers continue to work on a couple site plans within the city.  Planning Director Steven Patrick says both projects are not ready to be presented to the commission, so the group of city leaders will use their time to update the Master Plan, which is required by law to be revised or reviewed every five years.

Monday night's meeting begins at 6 p.m.

Free workshop for plant-based lifestyles Jan. 18

Free workshop for plant-based lifestyles Jan. 18

COOPERSVILLE, Mich.—Those who are vegetarian and vegan curious are invited to visit the Coopersville Area District Library for a free workshop Saturday, Jan. 18.

The event will include demonstrations on detoxing, juicing and creating satisfying and healthy smoothies.  There will also be information on how to kick off a plant-based lifestyle.

The workshop runs from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Coopersville City Council approves renewing inmate work agreement

Coopersville City Council approves renewing inmate work agreement

COOPERSVILLE, Mich.--  Coopersville will continue to use Ottawa County’s Sentence Work Abatement Program to help ease the workload of its Department of Public Works.

During Monday night’s meeting, the council unanimously approved renewing its SWAP service agreement for the year.  City Manager Steven Patrick says the program puts inmates to work, providing additional labor for the city at an economical rate.  Inmates are assigned to low-priority but necessary tasks like clearing paths, walkways, storm retention areas and washing city vehicles.

Patrick says Coopersville has been participating in SWAP for more than a decade.  

City narrows search for new employee

City narrows search for new employee

COOPERSVILLE, Mich.--   The City of Coopersville is narrowing its search to replace a longtime employee.

After 22 years of service to the city, Ken Ortquist will retire in March.  The city has received more than 20 applications for his position with the Department of Public Works and hope to begin interviewing candidates within the next two weeks.  The city hopes to have Ortquist’s replacement trained and ready to go when he leaves.

Date set for Coopersville's Outhouse 500

Date set for Coopersville's Outhouse 500

COOPERSVILLE, Mich.—The date is set for an unusual tradition shutting down downtown Coopersville.

The Outhouse 500 will return Feb. 22, 2014.  Right now, the Coopersville Merchants Group is accepting entry registrations. 

Each outhouse entered in the race must have four walls, a roof and a doorway with a crescent moon shape on it.  No glass, motors or riders are allowed.  The team name must be displayed on each side of the outhouse.